The TAV-6

TAV-9

The Gnobo planetary forces come with a fearsome reputation. Recruits are trained for months in the mountain ranges that criss-cross their home planet; they are at home fighting on unwelcoming terrain. They are moulded into proud warriors who rarely give up or give in. The TAV-6 (Tracked Armoured Vehicle) exemplifies this fighting style and spirit.

The vehicle’s torque, power and adaptability stem from its four independent drive tracks. These allow the TAV to traverse a wide variety of weather and ground unimpeded. What it lacks in high straight-line speed it more than makes up for with its ability to manoeuvre at pace.

The armour is thick and cleverly constructed; only the most advanced armour-piercing shells can penetrate in one shot. Like most tracked vehicles, however, it remains vulnerable on its underside to mines and other explosives.

The TAV is armed with the same fragmentation cannons as the S-91 Gun Skiff, meaning it can deliver significant damage on a variety of targets. The high-calibre guns are least accurate when targeting infantry, leading tank crews to request troops to ‘close escort’ the TAV. This usually involves four troops sat atop of the armoured shell to protect against enemy infantry. This is considered a plum assignment, as it means the escorting troops are saved many miles of marching across unfavourable terrain.

The first iteration (TAV-1) was deployed during the Gnobo invasion of Illayko territory, where its rugged reliability and thick armour gave the invaders an edge. A large number were destroyed from orbit during the Battle of Ompolor VII, the remainder were airlifted out ahead of the Illayko counter-attack.

TAV-9

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